Tag Archive: Campeche


Arrived Campeche 10:30 am, fairly bedraggled, after what turned out to be a 15 hour road trip from San Cristobal de las Casas. From the coach terminal took a cab, who’s driver turned a tad tetchy, when we paid him that which was agreed at the terminal, to which he showed “open mouthed” amazement when he got said amount, and no more! Bizarre.

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“Why so serious?….just give me the fare.”

 

I have long since developed a thick skin with respect to taxi drivers. They are masters at “sweating their transient asset.”

Hit the hay at two in the afternoon.

Next thing I knew it was Tuesday morning, bright sunshine, blue skies. Having had a damn good sleep, headed off out to investigate the town. Ambled along to the centre to where the church and public square was to be found, encompassing covered seating area/snack bar, and just watched life pass by for a while. The buildings around the centre are colourfully painted and well maintained.img_6686img_6683

The waterfront is a fairly anodyne affair. True, it had a concrete promenade. However, there is no seating to take in the view or relax. No trees or parasols for shade and nothing to engage ones interest.

However, this brief period of calm provides an opportunity for Lynn to engage with her recently acquired proclivity for gathering stones of varying size & shape, and painting them in vividly coloured acrylic. I met this newly acquired passion with a certain amount of trepidation as I suspected that we would be dragging these stones (extra weight)  around the country in our luggage!!

 

It seems that the UK Cabinet are due to meet this Friday (06.07.18) for yet another crucial meeting over the terms of our Brexit departure. Apparently May is going to try to sell them some kind of fudge concocted by Olly Robbins et al, that will leave us tied, in some Machiavellian way to the EU.

The next planned port of call will be MeridaMérida, the vibrant capital of the Mexican state of Yucatán, has a rich Mayan and colonial heritage. The city’s focal point is Plaza de la Independencia, bordered by the fortresslike Mérida Cathedral and white limestone Iglesia de la Tercera Orden, both colonial-era churches built using relics from ancient Mayan temples. The Casa de Montejo, a 16th-century mansion, is a landmark of colonial plateresque architecture.It also has a population of 770,000, so should be interesting to visit.

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Thursday 21.06.18 Arrived at 07:15 this morning after a 10 hour overland from Oaxaca. Managed to catch some snatches of sleep. However, still zonked most of Thursday. Stopping at  Hub guesthouse with our host James, a Liverpudlian guy that came out to Mexico & this area in 2016 and decided to stay.

“You wanna get there!…Well I sure wouldn’t start from here.”

San Cristobal has a strange kind of existence. I guess that it has, over the years, developed slowly from a mountain township that has supported, since the ’60’s  fragmented & variegated waves of dropouts, bohemians, artists, chancers & charlatans. One saunters by them, sat on the sidewalks on the main tourist thoroughfares beating out rhythms on bongos, weaving intricate stringed beads, strumming guitars and just chillin’ out & getting by in good natured indolence.img_6613 I’ve been frequenting El Cipres restaurant fairly regularly & got familiar with the owner Hernandez. He used to work in the US as a Chef however, after a marriage failure and a couple of other problems he came back south. Another Xpat called Tim from Canada, wound up here after he rejected “normal” life in Vancouver and came down south, married and settled down. Met a lady who had sold her trailer in California because the cost of living had become so burdensome that she had decided to move down to Mexico, where she could get by on a smaller budget.

The weather patterns experienced here in the mountains are curious, in that mornings tend to be clear blue skies, sunny & warm. However, as the afternoon comes around, the clouds roll in and squalls of rain take over, sometimes accompanied by thunder storms. However,  in the afternoon, it settles again through until later in the evening. During the night, showers come in again. Then the cycle is repeated.

The foothills around the Sierra Madre mountain range.

Will be leaving San Cristobal Sunday  01.07.18 19:00. It’s going to be a 12 hour road trip. First north to Villahermosa and then east to Palenque and again north, getting into Campeche on the Gulf of Mexico coast at 09:00 am Monday morning. Will not be seeing much in the way of vistas or landscapes as the night trip precludes that. Our ever sardonic & black humoured Liverpudlian host kindly related a couple of anecdotes describing how in recent months, an overland bus had been stopped by armed bandits and the people on board relieved of the contents of their wallets, passports & luggage; also a couple of Swiss cyclists touring the mountains had been run off the road. One killed outright and the other severely injured, which I thought a tad unhelpful of him to relate.

 

 

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